Tag Archives: leadership

Dana A Oliver @ The 3 Questions on Leadership and Motivation

Dana is a graduate of Northeastern University and ITT Technical Institute. He has approximately 30 years of experience in the field of medical devices, working for such companies as Medtronic, Genzyme, SIMS Level 1, Kirwan Surgical, and danaStrichman Medical. He has applied for over 30 patent applications and has been granted over 20 US patents till date.

He first appeared on 3 Questions series in September 2016 where he shared his views on Innovation and Strategy (Read here, Dana A Oliver @ The 3 Questions on Innovation and Strategy). We thank Mr.Oliver for taking time out to participate in our 3 questions interview series and sharing his thoughts. Continue reading

Product Management by Committee

One of the key issues that plagues a delivery team is having no Product Manager to guide the team. However, something that is more troublesome is having multiple Product Managers for a single product. This is what is sometimes referred to as “Product Management by Committee”. I am reminded of a scenario where a boat in a race had 5 people managing it and 4 people actually rowing.

Did you say “Oh, Come on..!! it can’t be that bad” ?

I personally feel that if you want to set a team up for failure, this is one of the things that you could definitely do.

Let us take a closer look at what the problems could be, with having multiple product managers.

Same goal, different priorities: Each PM tries to push his Agenda. Many times, each PM might have the same overall goal, but different priorities. They don’t want to contradict / confront each other. Often, they end up talking to some key resources in the team and pushing their items / enhancements without letting the other PMs know.

Collective knowledge or Collective confusion? There is a possibility that each PM has a different understanding to a scenario in the Product domain. For example, 2 PMs might have varying understanding of how an Insurance claim is to be handled when a car being driven by a person less than 25 years of age gets into an accident at a roundabout with a car driven by a drunk person. In such a scenario, the team would be chasing a moving target if they have to listen to both PMs.

Personality clash: PMs come in all shapes and sizes. Some are more technically oriented than others, some more forceful, some more knowledgeable and some more articulative. When you have a mix of such people providing directions, the team would be torn apart and staring straight at failure.

remix-monkeys-dance-clan-by-same-cc-by-sa-3-0

When Ted, my colleague took up the role of the Scrum Master for one such Agile team, this was one of the things that he identified as a failure factor. He set up a meeting with all 4 Product Managers and told them that henceforth the team would be happy to take inputs from all of them, however, all decisions and directions only from one of them. The PM committee now had to decide who that would be. They nominated Dave ( one of the key stakeholders within the PM committee) to be that person for the duration of the current release. This meant that

  • Dave would set priorities for the team and define the Acceptance criteria for each story.
  • Dave would resolve any conflict of ideas within the PM committee and provide direction to the Delivery team.
  • The Delivery team is not faced with various personalities with different agendas providing conflicting requirements. The team and PM have an opportunity to understand each other well and compliment each other for a successful delivery.

The team is now slowly increasing their iteration velocity, meeting most iteration commitments, gaining the trust of senior management and is able to enjoy their work. I believe this change has been the major factor in causing this turnaround.

Let us know what you think…

@SampathPrahalad

(Pic: Thanks to Remix Monkeys (A new creative look and Style on Urban Dance))

What’s your concern?

What keeps you concernsawake at night? what is one thing that keeps you on your toes?. The answer to this question is probably the core tenet of your profile and also your  organization’s expectation from you. It is good to know the answer to this question since it also helps in prioritizing your tasks at work. Here are some replies that I often to get to listen.

  1. too many bugs towards the tail end of the release
  2. long backlog list, I have too many features to add to the product
  3. competition, losing too many orders to them
  4. scope creeps
  5. over demanding stake holders
  6. Unreasonable customer demands
  7. opportunities  in market place
  8. too much interference from top management
  9. product road map
  10. …..many more

The answer to this question is important for you. Should this concern be your top focus? Is this concern taking away crucial hours from your planned strategic work, if so you are prone to spend significant amount of your time in coming days doing firefighting. Spend sometime, to begin with may be every week to get answer to this question. List down your top concerns and be sure you have strategic plan for concerns that are your priorities and permanent alternate solutions for concerns that are not part on top of your to-do / KRA list.

@mathurabhay

Product Mantra: You are Unique

“You are Unique” is the Mantra of motivation, confidence building and getting convinced that “Yes, I can do this”

Let me start with a confession. This product mantra “You are unique” is borrowed from / influenced by the title of a book authored by the most popular president of India, Dr A P J Abdul Kalam. This book hit the stands a few weeks backs and is already one of the most sought after books in the Indian Market. This book is already in its second print and for sure several more will follow.

{ order this book: Flipkart, Publishers: Punya Publishing}

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