Tag Archives: Agile

Requirements for Agile Lifecycle management tools

A couple of weeks ago, I was doing an evaluation of the many Agile Lifecycle management tools in the market for a customer of mine. I was pleasantly surprised to see the various options that an organization would have when they are looking for one.

Before we go further, let us define it. An Agile Lifecycle Management (ALM) tool is one which helps to manage your company’s Agile product development by providing a way to manage requirements, day to day work and progress reporting.

The first question that first comes to mind is “Do we need a tool to manage Agile product development?”
Well, if your team, your product owner and other interested stakeholders are co-located, there definitely is no need for an Agile Lifecycle management tool. A whiteboard, sticky notes, a chart paper for the burndown and a dedicated scrum master who keeps all this in good condition is sufficient enough. However, in today’s corporate world, the distributed product development scenario is one where a team, its product owner, other stakeholders and sometimes the Scrum Master are spread in different geographical locations across the world. For all such distributed product development environments, there definitely is a need for an ALM tool. Continue reading

Inspect and Adapt for Agile Product Managers

As organizations make their movement from Waterfall to Agile software development, a shift in culture takes place. One discipline that is most affected in this whole change is Product Management. They have to cope up with the demand for more releases within the same time and each release has to have meaningful content.

I have tried to list the traits needed for a successful Agile Product Manager here. Continue reading

Real Life Scenario: Product Roadmap gone sour

Jack’s organization launched a path breaking web based Application a couple of years ago, which took the market by storm, got in many new customers, filled up the coffers and made investors proud.

Over the years, the Product Manager moved on, some people in the Product development team were moved to other products, and few quit. To make matters worse, the demands from customers for enhancements and bug fixes kept coming in, the client environments evolved and the competition more or less caught up. Continue reading