3 Questions to Product Manager Tyler Strand

 

DSCN0265We start the interview series of Product Mantra in 2016 with a young technologist and product leader Tyler Strand, who is very clear in his thoughts about various aspects of product management. Product Mantra asked Tyler three questions. Continue reading

What do people search about “Product Management”?

Curiosity to find what people search for about product management, led me to dig a bit into what people searched online in the last one year.
I split the the search queries into these categories:

  • Job Search like “product management interview questions”
  • Software tools like “product lifecycle management tools”
  • Skill upgrade like “product management certification”
  • Informational like “what does a product manager do?”

Share of different categories of search queries

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Michelle L. Harper @ ‘The Three Questions for Product Manager’

Michelle L. Harper

Michelle is a Senior product management and product marketing leader with a proven record of accomplishments in leading and implementing product management programs in diverse organizations to create, develop and position successful award winning products. Continue reading

Shadow Product Manager – salvaging out of the situation

There are scores of situations where a Product Manager might find herself/himself getting entangled completely in tactical aspects of product management because the situation demands it or there are simply too much chaos in the organ223670395_7ca0c7a061_zization due to a disorganised way of working. There are also situations when one is with an off-shore development team, “far away” from the customers and key decision makers. It is easy to get completely disoriented and frustrated at the situation. There are ways to salvage out of the “situation” of being a “Shadow Product Manager”: Continue reading

Juan Fernandez @ ‘The Three Questions for Product Manager’

JFJuan Fernandez has been working as a Product Manager for Liferay since 2013, after transitioning from being a software engineer. As a product Manager, his expertise includes product vision definition and development, strategy and product, portfolio management. Juan holds a B.S. in Software Engineering from the university of Seville, Spain.

We thank Juan for taking out time and be part of ‘Three Questions for Product Manager’ series. With Juan we will focus on some of the core aspects of the product management. I am sure you will enjoy reading responses from Juan.

Product Mantra: As a product manager, where would you like to spend more time, talking to customers or working on UX?

Juan Fernandez: I have zero doubts about this: talking to customers (or even better, listening to them) is one of the most critical tasks a product manager has to constantly be doing. Customer feedback, along with market research, is what helps us drive our roadmaps and steer the direction of the product, so, yes, definitely communication with customers is where I’d like to spend more time.

Regarding working on the user experience, I think that it is certainly true that as a product manager it is one of your duties to make sure the experience using your product is delightful, and a decent degree of knowledge in this area is always great, but it’s the User Experience expert, the UX designer, who needs to do the user research and analysis and finally design the optimal experience, not the product manager.

Product Mantra: How would you comment to ‘product managers are a jack of all and master of none’?

Juan Fernandez: I think we are often seen that way, but I don’t like the negative implications of that sentence. I see product management as a role that is needed to connect the dots: a person that brings market knowledge to the product team, and also brings product information to sales, marketing, analysts, customers, etc. Because of that you must be able to wear several hats, you need to be able to understand deeply technical issues, or be part of business talks…and that is why you are sometimes seen as jack of all trades: not a purely technical person, not a pure business guy, always in the middle of everything.

But in spite of this fact, I think a product manager needs to be master of one thing: you need to master the market needs. Having a deep understanding on what your customers need, what the market is demanding, and what those problems are, is the most valuable thing you can bring to the table: that is what you really need to be good at.

Product Mantra: How important is it for a product manager to have experience of project management?

Juan Fernandez: There’s often confusion about these two positions, product and project management, but at the same time they are extremely different.

In my opinion, the key for differentiating both roles is this: the product manager helps define what problems need to be solved while the project manager helps by coordinating the product team in the execution of a solution for those problems. The former is a strategic role, and the latter is a tactical one.

Having clarified this, I’ve seen product managers transitioning from sales, engineering and also from project management positions, and each of them, each of us, have different challenges when adapting to the new position. The challenge for a product manager with a project management background is to leave the control of all the execution details behind and focus on the vision and strategy of the product.

Thanks Juan.

Juan Fernandez on Social Media

  1. Follow Juan on twitter at: @juanferrub
  2. Get connected with her on Linkedin:-  https://es.linkedin.com/pub/juan-fernández-rubio/24/bb3/583
  3. Read his blogs: https://medium.com/@juanferrub

@mathurabhay

Mike Lehr @ ‘The Three Questions’

Since 2003, as President and Founder of Omega Z Advisors, LLC, Mike Lehr has worked as a change management specialist prepping and moving people through change. He accomplished this either as a contractor or as an organizer and leader of project teams. Mike has been
speaking publicly for over 40 years. He has trained Mike Lehrand coached for over 25 years.

Since 2007, Mike has had an intense focus on helping firms implement new IT infrastructures and applications as well as developing IT talent. Mike spends much time raising IT to the human level.

Mike has blogged since 2010, writing over 500 original posts of over 150,000 words. It is an extensive reference tool. Mike is also the author of The Feminine Influence in Business a comprehensive book about integrating more intuitive approaches with classical ones to develop talent, influence and solve problems. < Read more about Mike Lehr >

We thank Mike for taking out time and be part of ‘Three Questions’ series. With Mike we will focus on  managing self and how do we become better professional. I am sure you will enjoy reading Mike.

Product Mantra: Mike you have been in the business for over 20 years now, what makes
you believe that ‘influencing’ and ‘problem solving’ are key to achieve change as desired.

Mike Lehr: Very simply Abhay, we cannot do anything without being able to influence or solve problems. Influencing comes into play from leadership to IT introductions. Problem solving comes into play from talent assessment to product roll-outs. Change is no different.

How do we achieve change? That is a problem. It needs a solution. That requires problem solving skills.

Yes, we might know the solution immediately. It might not seem like a problem. Yet, it is. The problem could be that we are just going through the motions. We are thinking inside the box. Experience is a side of that box. That’s why laypersons often have innovative ideas outside of their experience. The man who solved the measuring of longitude was a watch maker, not an astronomer as were all the other experts of that time.

How do we bring about change? We need to influence people. We need to influence ourselves. Both require motivation. Even if others are solving the problem for you, you must motivate them even if it’s simply by paying them. That’s influence. Money is influence.

I challenge anyone to find a way to achieve change without influencing and problem solving.

Product Mantra: Investing in self is really important, what would be your advice to mid-level executives in this regard. What kind of learning, certification or training will help them prepare better for later part of their career?

Mike Lehr: Abhay, I have run training that people have found very valuable even though they learned nothing new. That is because I presented the same material in a way that motivated them to use it.

I often claim that people could be successful without learning one new thing if, and this is a big if, they would just apply 10% of what they learned but had never implemented.

Trainers make big bucks teaching people the same things that they learned but never implemented. Some people collect knowledge like they do tools, kitchen utensils or exercise equipment. It’s simple. Use what you already know. That’s the lesson.

Beyond that learn to be confident. Learn to believe in what you do know and can do. Confidence influences people even when nothing else might be there. Confidence is a tool. It is not a state of being.

People like confident people. Studies show this is true even if people do not know where that person is going. Confidence triggers the emotional need for security in all of us.

Product Mantra: Tell us something about your work on integrating more intuitive approaches with classical ones to develop talent, influence and solve problems.

Mike Lehr: In general, Abhay, integrating more intuitive approaches is about tapping people’s emotions to influence and solve problems. It is about changing how they see things, not changing the things they see.

For example, consider customer service. The classic approach sees the problem objectively. That means to improve customer service we teach ways to improve service. The focus is on service. We change the thing. That thing is service.

Now, I trained people to improve customer service without teaching them one thing to improve that service. Initially, when I say that I stump many people. That is because we do not consider people’s emotions, thoughts or behaviors regarding that service. The focus is on things (service) not people.

Even if we provide good service, there is no guarantee that people will notice it. My training focused on showing people how to ensure that customers noticed it. I didn’t have them change the service. I just taught them ways to change how customers saw the service.

For instance, studies show that when customers see a busy staff their assessment of service goes up even though none of that activity is about them. Conversely, when they see staff hanging around talking to one another, their assessment of service goes down even if nothing changed about the service they received.

In some ways, this is very similar to the way a branding, marketing or advertising campaigns change people’s impressions of products and services. The difference is that we apply these principles on an interpersonal level.

This can save tons of money. We don’t have to change things. We just change how people see things. In problem solving, this means we don’t solve the problem. We just change how we think, feel and react to it. That might mean we find that the problem isn’t really a problem.

When we integrate the two, we change things and change how people see things. This is even more powerful than either approach alone.

Thanks Mike.

Mike Lehr on web:

  1. Follow Mike on twitter @ MikeLehrOZA
  2. Connect with Mike on Linkedin 
  3. Omega Z Advisors
  4. Mike Lehr’s blog

@mathurabhay

Risk Management in an Agile world

With the craze of many companies and organizations, big and small to jump onto the Agile bandwagon, a few areas of traditional Software development get ignored or trivialized. More often than not, these come back to bite us late in the cycle. In true Agile fashion, teams then scramble to do the best they can to get the product over the line.

One such area of Software Development that sometimes gets overlooked is Risk Management. Traditional Risk management had projects following either the qualitative or the quantitative approach to Risk management. Detailed risk mitigation would be then put in place to ensure that the Risk was well handled. Many times, this placed a considerable overhead on the team.

Agile teams following the Scrum or XP model inherently embed Risk Management. Risks would typically be identified when the team throws up impediments in the daily standup OR fails to meet its Sprint commitment (because of a story being more complicated or having a dependency that failed to fall in place). Whatever the reason may be, Agile teams are pretty good in throwing up Impediments quite early. These impediments could turn into significant risks, more so when they involve external stakeholders and other teams.

In view of keeping the processes light weight, Agile methodologies are not prescriptive about how the risks can be made visible or managed. From a management perspective, the PMO or Senior Management might see this as a flaw in the Agile methodology since they do not get enough visibility about the risks and hence unable to step in at the right time to clear the path.

In such a scenario, here are some tips that would help.

  • If using an electronic tool like Jira or Rally, raise a work item of type ‘Risk’, provide a severity rating to it and put a Blocked status onto it. Assign them to the right stakeholder and publish a weekly list of these risks to the management. Note: Make sure that the key stakeholders have access and are watchers to these risks.
  • If using a physical board, create a 3 x 3 Risk matrix (Probability(L,M,H) vs Impact(L,M,H)) on the physical board, put up the risk and assign the stakeholder’s avatar to it. Take a snapshot on a weekly basis and send it out to the management stakeholders.
  • Report your blocker in the Scrum of Scrums meeting, explain the potential consequences and nudge the management to take action (mitigate, avoid or accept).

In short, the key to an effective Risk management in an Agile world is to make it highly visible, accountable, time bound and easy to action upon.

Are there other light weight and effective Risk management practices that your Agile team follows ??
Do let us know..