Dana A Oliver @ The 3 Questions on Innovation and Strategy

Dana is a graduate of Northeastern University and ITT Technical Institute. He has approximately 30 years of experience in the field of medical devices, working for such companies as Medtronic, Genzyme, SIMS Level 1, Kirwan Surgical, and Strichman Medical. He has applied for over 30 patent applications and has been granted over 20 US patents to date.dana

Dana published his first business guide book “Mantra Leadership – Don’t Become the Emperor with No Clothes!” in January 2015. His second book Mantra Design – Innovate, Buy or Die! was published in October 2015. Dana plans to become an independent Consultant and Educator in calendar year 2016 offering expertise in Innovation Leadership. He lives in Jacksonville, FL with his wife Linda and daughter “Lexi” Alexandra.

To learn more, please visit http://www.mantraleadership.com/

We thank Mr. Dana for taking out time from his busy schedule and participate in our 3 Questions interview series.

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3 Questions to Product Manager Suzie Prince

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With ProductMantra today is a Product Manager whose passion is minimalism. With her minimalist philosophy she creates products that are valuable, usable, feasible and desirable. Presenting to you Suzie Prince, who at present is the Head of Product at ThoughtWorks Studios. Typical to our interview series, we asked Suzie three questions.

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How can Product Managers identify tech debts

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Did you know how Amazon Web Services was born?

In early 2000s Amazon was growing quickly and hiring new software engineers, yet they were still finding, in spite of the additional people, they weren’t building applications any faster…The internal teams at Amazon required a set of common infrastructure services everyone could access without reinventing the wheel every time, and that’s precisely what Amazon set out to build — and that’s when they began to realise they might have something bigger.

This is an excerpt from TechCrunch. AWS was an extraordinary solution to a technical debt.

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Customer visits by Product Managers

Product Managers (of enterprise products) must visit customers. However, customer visits for Product Managers are important but not urgent. If you miss a customer meeting, you would not notice anything amiss in the short term, however if you keep missing customer meetings, you will find yourself grappling to catch-up in the long-term. That is the reason you must schedule customer meetings well in advance – block your calendar – so that there is no excuse for you to skip. Continue reading

Rasmus Skjoldan @ ‘The Three Questions for Product Manager’

Rasmus_webRasmus Skjoldan is the lead product manager of Magnolia, the CMS behind sites for the likes of Virgin America, Airbus, Al Arabiya and Atlassian. Before joining Magnolia, he was
the user experience lead of the open source content application framework,
Neos—a challenge that originated from his many years in the TYPO3 community. Besides his CMS work, he co-founded Cope, the first purely content strategy focused consultancy in Denmark. Continue reading

How can Product Managers extract value from Data Scientists

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Product Managers are supposed to be metrics driven and are used to extracting and analysing data to understand how the product has been performing – for the customers/users and for the business. This is usually done as an operational exercise on a day to day basis or sometimes to figure out the cause of something unusual happening on the product. This is a typical usage of dash-boarding and business intelligence; perfectly fine if you do not (or cannot) collect data beyond a few key metrics. Continue reading